Writing for academic publication 

Course Code:    ANLTC 2010/01

 Date:    Wednesday 3 February  2010                       

 Venue:    John Paul 2 Library, NUI Maynooth 

 Description:     Writing for academic publication offers library staff an opportunity to share experiences, research, opinions and practice with colleagues nationally and internationally.  While this course focused primarily on writing for journals, other forms of publication such as book reviews, book chapters and conference papers will be touched on.  The course has a strong practical emphasis and participants will do an outline and begin to draft an article during the workshop.

 Audience:     The course is for library staff who wish to write for publication.

 The morning session is a workshop.  Following lunch, librarians who have published will share their experience and a journal editor will give tips and practical guidance on maximising the chances of publishing

 By the end of the course participants will have:

  •  A clear understanding of the different requirements for publishing in peer-reviewed and professional journals
  • Explored methods for identifying suitable topics and different writing approaches for different audiences
  • Practiced a range of techniques for generating ideas and structuring articles
  • Examined factors which contribute to style and writing flow
  • Gained first hand experience from a journal editor of reasons for  accepting/rejecting manuscripts and how to maximize your chance of acceptance
  • Drawn up an outline and commenced drafting draft an article
  • Gained familiarity with a range of wikis and blogs to support librarians as academic writers
  • Identified two peer-support people from the group to help progress their writing

Note:    Numbers are limited to 16 

Cost:     €120

 Presenters:     Helen Fallon (NUI Maynooth) will present the workshop.    Guest speakers are Dr. John Cullen (NUI Maynooth) a former librarian who has published extensively and Marjory Sliney (Editor, An Leabharlann)

 Slides from this event EVENT201001SLID

 

E-Publishing and digital scholarly communication

Course Code:    2010/02

Date:    Friday, 19 March 2010

Description:    This workshop will offer an insight into current trends, challenges and methodologies in e-publishing and highlight future directions in scholarly communication. Participants will be informed about innovative digital humanities projects currently underway throughout Ireland and will be introduced to the work of the Digital Humanities Observatory (DHO), which serves to support and guide these projects. Kevin Hawkins, University of Michigan, will share his expertise with attendees. He is joined by Dr Susan Schreibman, a leading international digital humanities scholar. They will discuss successful and unsuccessful e-publishing ventures and discuss the implications of both.  Claire Warwick will discuss research carried out at UCL DIS on how humanities scholars use digital resources, and talk about what features they need, and what they enjoy or find frustrating about them. She will go on to describe how users can and should be involved in the process of designing digital resources, ideally from the beginning of the project, and look at the lessons we can learn from good practice by the builders of well-used resources.

 Audience:    Anyone interested in the development and management of projects in e-publishing and digital humanities

Course presenters:     Dr Susan Schreibman, Director of the DHO;  Kevin Hawkins, Visiting Metadata Manager at the DHO and Electronic Publishing Librarian at the University of Michigan;  Dr. Claire Warwick, Director UCL Centre for Digital Humanities Programme and Director Electronic Communication and Publishing UCL Department of Information Studies

Host Library:    Royal Irish Academy, Dublin

Capacity:  60

Cost: €100

EVENT  CANCELLED

Cutting-edge internet search techniques

Course Code:     ANLTC 2010/03

Date:     Friday 14 May 2010                0930-1630

Description:     Efficient searching of the Internet can be invaluable when dealing with enquiries. Simply entering a few keywords, or juggling a string of Boolean algebra into your favourite search engine can sometimes produce just what you need to give a good answer. However, on those occasions when you end up with absolutely no hits, or worse still thousands of apparently useless results, it can be extremely frustrating.

This course is designed to help participants use the Internet as effectively as possible when dealing with enquiries. Practical examples and hands-on approaches will reveal the nature of the Internet, and help discover the most appropriate ways to find relevant materials.

By the end of the course participants will have:

  • in-depth knowledge of the world wide web, the invisible web and the human web
  • the ability to choose appropriate search engines and other discovery tools
  • templates to help with advanced search strategies
  • a set of URLs to keep them updated on advances in search techniques
  • hands-on experience of trying out some cutting-edge techniques

Audience:      The course is directed at library staff who have been using the Internet to answer enquiries for at least two years. Participants must understand the basic mechanics of using the net, and have some experiences of the joys and disappointments of searching.

Note:    Numbers are limited on this course

Host library:     Dublin Institute of Technology

Course Location:     DIT Library, Aungier St. Dublin 2.

Presenter:       Terry Kendrick, Cilip trainer

Fee:                             €140

Programme 

 

Institutional repositories and metadata

Course Code :    ANLTC 2010/04

Date :    Wednesday 1 September 2010                       

Venue :     The Library, DCU 

Description:    This course will be tailored to meet the needs of ANLTC member institutions and will be delivered in the context of existing work done on local institutional repositories and on the national portal.  Through the course participants will build on their current metadata skills and learn to improve the performance and retrievability of material from institutional repositories.    This course is not about setting up an institutional repository.

Audience:    This course is intended for library and information staff with responsibility for metadata development, creation and for the tagging of a variety of materials in institutional repositories.   Numbers are limited to 15

Cost:    €120

Presenter:    David Haynes – CILIP Trainer.   David is an information consultant who has advised professional bodies, government departments, academic institutions and commercial organisation about taxonomies and has developed file plans, thesauri and classification schemes. He is also author of ‘Metadata for Information Management and Retrieval’ published by Facet Publishing.

 

Designing and delivering a new learning space 

Venue:    McClay Library, Queen’s University Belfast

Course Code:    ANLTC 2010/05

Date:    14-15th October, 2010

Description:    Current trends in library design include provision for self-service, social learning and mobile technologies, with reference to ‘digital natives’ and the internet generation. The McClay library at Queen’s opened in 2009 and is an excellent example of current library building. Bringing together wide-ranging library, computing and media services in a single location, the building blends the best features of a traditional library with the latest technology. The highest quality services and support are fully integrated within the building, making it an exciting and essential part of the student experience at Queen’s.

It is clear that the ‘internet generation’ no longer learns in a traditional or formal way. They have a more immediate response to ideas, value easy access to information and are comfortable using IT in every shape and form. Learning, through interaction, exposure and linking ideas and information by association, rather than through linear thinking, has become a new focus in education. This presents a challenge to anyone refurbishing or designing libraries from now on.

Associative learning is a term familiar to psychologists and describes the ability to link objects and behaviour. Research at the Salk Institute indicates that ‘Our eyes take in the visual environment and break the incoming images down into simple features such as color, brightness, motion and form…this ability helps us to make sense out of what we see faster and more efficiently.’

Salk Institute (2007, March 15). Associative Memory — Learning At All Levels.   Science Daily. Retrieved May 5, 2010,    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070314134812.htm

Audience:    This is aimed at those with responsibilities for library design and service development.

Programme

 

Cutting-edge internet search techniques

Course Code:     ANLTC 2010/07

Date:     Monday 29th November 2010        09.30-16.30

Description:    Efficient searching of the Internet can be invaluable when dealing with enquiries. Simply entering a few keywords, or juggling a string of Boolean algebra into your favourite search engine can sometimes produce just what you need to give a good answer. However, on those occasions when you end up with absolutely no hits, or worse still thousands of apparently useless results, it can be extremely frustrating.

This course is designed to help participants use the Internet as effectively as possible when dealing with enquiries. Practical examples and hands-on approaches will reveal the nature of the Internet, and help discover the most appropriate ways to find relevant materials.

By the end of the course participants will have:

  • in-depth knowledge of the world wide web, the invisible web and the human web
  • the ability to choose appropriate search engines and other discovery tools
  • templates to help with advanced search strategies
  • a set of URLs to keep them updated on advances in search techniques
  • hands-on experience of trying out some cutting-edge techniques

Audience:    The course is directed at library staff who have been using the Internet to answer enquiries for at least two years. Participants must understand the basic mechanics of using the net, and have some experiences of the joys and disappointments of searching.

Note:    Numbers are limited on this course.

Host library:     James Hardiman Library, NUI, Galway.

Presenter:    Terry Kendrick, CILIP Trainer

Fee:                 €125

 

Managing exhibitions in libraries 

Course Code:    ANLTC 2010/06

Date:    Thursday 2nd December 2010   RESCHEDULED TO 2011                     

Venue:    National Library of Ireland  

Description:    Developing exhibition programmes in Libraries is a relatively new feature in many Libraries. The National Library has been responsible for a number of exhibitions over the recent past, including the award winning Yeats exhibition, but staff are also involved on an ongoing basis with smaller temporary installations to promote different aspects of Library collections and services, they have built up considerable in-house expertise in developing exhibition progammes.

 The course will cover the following areas: 

  •  The purpose of exhibitions and choosing an exhibition theme
  • Designing an exhibition, content, material, visual, multimedia
  • Conservation and preservation requirements
  • Marketing
  • Developing educational programmes around exhibitions  
  • Tour of the Library’s Discovery Exhibitions

Audience:    This course is intended for library and information staff involved or responsible for developing exhibition and the progammes around them.

 Note:    Numbers are limited to 15

Cost:    €120

Presenters:    Staff from the Exhibitions and Outreach Department of the National Library will provide this course.

Application Form